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Speech Team

Posted by: Natalie Fernandez in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

Day 1: What the heck does the speech team do on a mission trip?
Speech samples are harder to obtain in Legazpi City, Philippines than in Quito, Ecuador because the children are so shy. The schooling here is social/play based in kindergarten so the cialis com use of narratives and books is a novelty in younger children. We used prayer recitation to get rough connected speech samples. Mainly working with plosive/high pressure sounds we evaluated single word utterances for b/p t/d productions to note nasal air emissions which would imply palatal insufficiency or incompetency. During the evaluations we also probed for stimulability of certain developmentally appropriate sounds whiled noting compensatory strategies and roughly assessing overall intelligibility. We took note of school attendance and social aptitude via parent reports.
The starkest difference (among many) between the evals we are doing here compared to evals in the U.S. is the lack of dynamic assessment of clients. This is due to the limited time and high volume of patients on triage day (when all screenings are done). Our goals here are short term in the sense that we are here to determine which clients would benefit most from speech surgery (flap, furrow, fat injection, sphincter). Thus, we prioritized clients with relatively intact articulation with hyper-nasality being their main obstacle to communication.
It is our hope that speech therapy resources will be allotted to those that need the services (i.e. those children that have their lips repaired by the mission trip and still have open cleft palates). Often, therapy follow up is needed by all the tramadol 100mg order surgery recipients to eliminate compensatory strategies and teach them how to use the new articulators to make speech sounds. Surgery changes faces, improves quality of visit our site viagra best peice life, eliminates bullying and zithromax buy online provides education and work opportunities, but the use of the new lip/palate needs to be practiced to achieve all desired intelligibility results. Oftentimes parents in developing countries think the surgical services of mission trips are a result of magic or divine intervention. In a way, they are; however, the gift of a new palate needs to be practiced and used, or else the magic fades away.

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Young Lives Changed Forever

Posted by: Gail Henrickson in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

In my last message, I admitted confusion about the time change, which was a good thing because I was wrong.  Whenever you’re reading this in the States, it’s not yesterday in the Philippines, but tomorrow.  And from the FOT perspective, the future looks good!  Before leaving on this mission I was told that I would likely bond with at least one special child … and that turned out to be so true!  My special connection was with a 14-year-old girl named Genevieve.  I first saw her during patient screening – a thin girl whose cleft lip was twisted in a way that exposed her front teeth.  Whenever I saw her she kept her head down, avoiding eye contact and even more the rodashotel.com camera.  The day before surgery, Genevieve remained morose and non-communicative.  I gave her one of the donated pretty dresses and she perked up a bit.  The day following surgery, although she was obviously in pain, Genevieve was wearing her dress and visit web site cheap seroquel started interacting with the FOT nursing staff.  And then on discharge day, a transformed Genevieve grabbed me by the arm, pulled me aside for a big hug, and asked me to take her photo.  She flashed the “V for Victory” sign, her hair pulled back into cute pigtails.  As one of the nurses remarked, “she’s now ready to face the world.”

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The Most Rewarding Mission

Posted by: Chona Chatto in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

I have helped coordinate for FOT in the Philippines since the 2011 mission in Bohol.  I think this mission has been very successful.  I was able to connect with the government offices of Senator Binay and Governor Salceda, and also with the wonderful staff of generic viagra cost the Bicol Regional Training & Teaching Hospital.  My main contact there was Mr. Peter Almonte, who did most of the work to make this mission one of the greatest ever.  We had to change locations because of the hurricane and political issues, and so it was a bumpy ride going to Legazpi.  However, everything turned out smoothly, which to me is the most rewarding part of my work with Faces of Tomorrow.

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I can’t believe the week of the mission went by so quickly!  This was clearly one of FOT’s best missions ever.  We had amazing help from the local, regional and national Philippine governments, and the BRTTH hospital did everything possible to be helpful.  Our patients were wonderful and we really felt an emotional connection to many to them, and a warm appreciation for what we did.  The nursing staff was incredible, and we felt we were working alongside them in true collaboration.  There were no complications and all the surgeries were successful.  The FOT team was awesome and worked like a well-oiled machine!

Dr. Brian Rubinstein, Surgeon and http://www.dpsg-hamburg.de/buying-online-viagra Founder

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Amazing mothers...

Posted by: Alison Vander Veen in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

 

One thing I found fascinating in working with the mothers of these children was their natural competence in feeding their babies.  Complete cleft lips/palates create problems in creating suction when feeding, but the Philippine moms have pretty well figured out what they need to do so their babies are nourished.
When I asked if they have any problems, I found the sales cialis mothers to be generally confident.  They’ve adapted and adjusted and are very calm about their situation, without any real “issues”.  Unlike the in the States where we provide so much information to new moms on feeding babies with clefts, most of what I told these mothers was more confirmation than news … so it turned out I was the one on the receiving end of the education!

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Now that the Legazpi mission is over, I’ve had time to reflect on what a successful mission it’s been.  All of our patients were primary cases with unrepaired clefts, and we felt that we made a huge, positive impact on the children and families of Legazpi.  The BRTTH hospital was extremely supportive and facilitated everything we needed from them.  Their heart was definitely in the right place to conduct this mission.   All in all, the Faces of Tomorrow team had a fabulous time and we can’t wait to do it again – hopefully we will return to Bicol Province soon!

Nima Pahlavan, Surgeon

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A Father's Love

Posted by: Traci Schmidt in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

Last night there was a little girl named Clarissa, nicknamed Minny, who sat waiting patiently for hours in the pre-op area.  When she came back from surgery, it took a long time for her to wake up.  We brought in her father, who had been waiting at the window, to help.  He stood by the bed looking down at her and tears filled his eyes.  “Now she can go to school” he said. “She’s beautiful — thank you, thank you”.  He sat next to her whispering “Minny, Minny” over and over until she finally woke up.  Even though I didn’t understand another word he said, he was speaking in the universal language of love … it took my breath away.

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A Birthday Gift

Posted by: Dr. Charles Shih in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

The FOT team was happy to find lots of patients waiting for us when we arrived in Legazpi City.  We were able to completely fill our operating schedule, and unfortunately had to turn a few away.  Nonetheless, it was a great start to the mission.  Yesterday, I operated on a bilateral cleft lip for an 6 year old boy named John Carlo.  The surgery went well, and the next day while making rounds I noticed on his chart that it was his sixth birthday.  We were able to present him with gift of a new smile and only today viagra, candadian drugs sing “happy birthday”.  Too bad he was still in some pain and couldn’t smile as much as he clearly wanted to.

-Dr. Charles Shih, surgeon

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Beyond Imagination

Posted by: Meryl Bloom in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

I’ve been hearing about these missions from my son Brian Rubinstein from the very beginning, but the actual experience was far beyond what I could imagine.  I have friends who want to hear about my adventure, and I hope I’ll be able to find the words to express how deeply I’ve been affected.  New words will need to be coined to express how amazing, unexpected and life-changing this experience has been for me.  It will be hard to say good-bye to this group of talented and caring people who give up their time from jobs and family to serve others on these Faces of Tomorrow missions.

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I experienced a heart-felt moment in the recovery room when we had two teenagers, a boy and a girl. I tried to imagine what it must be like to live 15 years with a face that others find hideous.  When we brought in their mothers, one of them was so emotional that she couldn’t bear to uncover her face, while the other could not stop crying.  “Look at her” she said, “now the http://artiese.ca/price-levitra other kids won’t be laughing at her at school.”  At another bed, a father was holding his child — when he saw what was happening with the mothers, he began crying as well.  I’ve been on a lot of missions, but this was a scene that truly touched my heart.

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Importance of Change

Posted by: Dr. John Roche in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

On Tuesday, my second patient was a cleft lip repair — another beautiful child, with or without a cleft.  When I brought her father to the bedside to see her after surgery, he smiled and said “now she can go to school.”  I learned that she’s nine years old and www.dpsg-hamburg.de because of her cleft lip had not yet been to school, and that her older sister had been educating her.

- Dr. John Roche, surgeon

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For This We Have Come

Posted by: Gail Henrickson in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

FOR THIS WE HAVE COME

Submitted by Gail Henrickson – “non-medical” auction winner

This is Day 3 – I’ve given up trying to figure out which day to report in this blog, because whenever you’re reading this, it’s yesterday in the Philippines … which proves that time is “made up.”

While anticipating my trip – the first time I’ve ever done anything like this – my only fear was that I would find it too heart-breaking to see so many disfigured faces all in one place.  It took about five minutes to get over that misconception.  What one sees is the spirit of the children in their shining eyes, and the joy in their unusual smiles.

And what strikes me even more is the very strong bond between parents and children.  I spent some time with a young man named Chris Aquino, a member of the Daraga Chapter of Junior Chamber International (more about that fine organization to follow, on the FOT Facebook page).  He explained it beautifully.  “In the Philippines, we have a saying:  our children are more precious than diamonds.”

FOT is honored to have these parents – and grandparents, and aunts & uncles – trust their beloved children to us.  You can feel their anticipation upon arrival …  their anxiety as the child is heading to surgery … their concern during recovery … and their joy as they gaze at the child’s transformed face.

It was also explained to me that the Philippine people tend to be reserved and relatively unemotional – and as I watch their quiet love for their children my heart melts …. and I have the privilege of experiencing first-hand why the dedicated FOT volunteers give so much of themselves on every mission.

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Winning the Lottery

Posted by: Lewis deWitt in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

I feel like I won the lottery ticket to be able to go on this mission! 
 
“Interestingly”, I had already arranged for the time off, planning to take a ski trip.  Then I got the buying real levitra without prescription call from Dr. John Foy, who asked if I’d like to do anesthesia for cleft lip/palate surgeries in the Philippines.  It took me about two seconds to say “YES!”
 
At first I was a little shocked to see so many children with disfigured faces … but that went away fast and all I saw was the beautiful children whose lives I was about to help change.  So here I am in a foreign country, looking out the hotel window at a live volcano and ships in the Legazpi City harbor.  Life is good!!
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FACES OF TOMORROW  -- THE INCREDIBLE WORK BEHIND THE SCENES!
Submitted by Gail Henrickson – “non-medical” auction winner
For those of us who attend the annual FOT fundraiser, our hearts are touched and our wallets are opened to support this life-changing work.  We see children’s “before & after” photos that tell the story of why so many people do so much on a volunteer basis.
I had the great joy of being the winner of the live auction opportunity for a “non medical” person to join the levitra priese FOT team on its next mission to the Philippines.  I was excited to participate, and now I’m pleased to share some of the incredible, inspiring work I’ve witnessed in the medical mission in the Bicol Province.  I look forward to sharing more of my experience in days to come.
Though we clearly see the RESULTS of Faces of Tomorrow, what we DON’T see is the tremendous amount of work that goes into making a mission possible.  
OF COURSE, IT STARTS WITH FUNDING … Money is the lifeblood of any volunteer organization, and FOT is blessed to receive annual donations that fund an entire week’s worth of surgeries at no charge to the patients or the sponsoring hospital.  The bulk of the donations are raised at the annual Golf Benefit, along with others who believe in the cause.  During the past summer, “ACES FOR FACES” – a group of big-hearted bikers in the Pacific Northwest – held a charity ride that raised more than $6,000 – enough to fund 25 surgeries, or a third of the Philippine mission!  FOT’s work would not be possible without the caring, generous support of so many.
THEN THERE’S THE PLANNING … The FOT Board meets throughout the year, and dozens of letters are exchanged regarding possible sites and hospitals.  The team is recruited … itineraries are planned … and 30 large medical bags are packed with everything the team will need to perform a week of surgeries.  The lead team holds advance meetings with the sponsor hospital and look here levitra medication government representatives, along with trouble-shooting to surface potential issues.
AND FINALLY THE STAGE IS SET … Bright and early Sunday morning potential patients are screened in a well-orchestrated process … with a slight edge of chaos.  The intake team does the initial charting and photo documentation, followed by screenings with surgery, pediatrics, speech and dental.  Dr. Rubinstein then leads the team in determining which patients can be treated, and in which order.  Surgeries are scheduled, along with breaking the soft viagra hard news to some that there will be no surgery – usually due to a child’s health issues that make an operation too risky.  At the same time, the contents of those 30 medical bags need to be unpacked and sorted … surgical suites and supply areas are set up … the inevitable surprises and additional needs are coordinated with the hospital.
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The Faces of Tomorrow (FOT) team arrived in Legazpi City, Philippines at 11am on February 1st and wasted no time getting straight to work!  As soon as everyone was situated with the lodging, we took a 20 minute bus ride to the hospital, followed by an army truck loaded to the top with operating equipment. 

Once at the Bicol Regional Teaching and buy viagra without a prescription Training Hospital, we met with the hospital staff for an orientation and briefing session and a tour of the facilities where we will be working for the next seven days.  We were extremely impressed with how organized and helpful the 40+ local staff has been throughout the process.  Within a couple of hours Dr. Rubinstein and the rest of the team created a game plan of how they were going to accomplish the enormous feat of operating on 10-12 patients per day for the next five days.  The task is no easy one, but the team is excited and ready for the challenge ahead!

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Lead Team in the Philippines

Posted by: Deanna Ponseti in FOT Blog

Tagged in: Faces of Tomorrow , Blog

The lead team of Faces of Tomorrow arrived in the Philippines today!  Simone, Barbara, Gail, Charlotte, and Kristen are busy working with the local volunteers and government officials in anticipation of the main FOT group arrival February 1st.  The lead team visits the hospital, gathers supplies, and takes care of many odds and viagra online best price ends to ensure the success of FOT's 6th mission.

Our dedicated team will begin screening patients February 2nd!  Be sure to check back here for more from our bloggers . . .

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Faces of Tomorrow In the Press

Manila Bulletin ArticleLEGAZPI CITY, Albay – Faces of Tomorrow (FOT), a group of American medical practitioners, held a five-day mission at the Bicol Regional Training and Teaching Hospital (BRTTH), here.

Dr. Brian Rubinstein, FOT director, said 57 kids, the youngest being 18 months old, benefited from the corrective and surgical measures undertaken by his team.  Children born with cleft lip and palate abound in Bicol. Composed of volunteer surgeons, doctors, nurses, and other medical practitioners, FOT conducted 43 cleft lip operations and 14 cleft palate facial surgeries on patients who came from different parts of the region.

Read More: US Docs Bring Smiles to Bicol Children  

Patient Stories

  • Ella Mae - Tears of Happiness

    Ella-Mae-01Ella Mae is a 15-year-old lovely young woman.  Many FOT team members commented on her sweet she was throughout the whole process of triage to surgery to recovery.

    She has three siblings, and her favorite thing to do is to help her mother with household chores.  She enjoys school and hopes to become a science teacher someday.

    Read More: Ella Mae - Tears of Happiness  
  • Geneviv - Ready for the World

    Geneviv-01Before leaving on this mission I was told that I would likely bond with at least one special child … and that turned out to be so true! My special connection was with a 14-year-old girl named Geneviv.

    I first saw her during patient screening – a thin girl whose cleft lip was twisted in a way that exposed her front teeth.

    Whenever I saw her she kept her head down, avoiding eye contact and even more the camera.

    Read More: Geneviv - Ready for the World  
  • "Junior" Isorena - aka Superman!

    Junior with the DocTen-year-old Junior has already seen a great deal of trouble in his young life.  His mother died when he was three months old, and he's being raised by his maternal grandmother and an aunt.  His older brother by two years suffers from seizures, and his oldest brother died at the age of 14.  Junior's father is in his life as much as possible, but he's away from home most of the time working on the family's rice and www.micropraca.sk sugar cane farm.  To add to their problems, their home burned down just a few days before the FOT mission began.

    Read More: "Junior" Isorena - aka Superman!